Airborne Hyperspectral & Ground-Truthing

Hyperspectral and Ground-Truthing Whitepaper available from PAS

For a wide range of critical applications, the combination of airborne hyperspectral with ground-based non-imaging hyperspectral radiometers represents the optimal solution. A comprehensive white paper on the topic, written by Headwall Photonics and ASD Inc, part of Malvern Panalytical, is one of many available from PAS for your reference. The paper offers excellent background and specific examples of applications, procedures and results.

The worldwide precision agriculture industry is vital on so many fronts because countries depend on the revenue derived from citrus, wine-grapes, nuts and other specialty crops. Also, famine relief is the byproduct of successfully planting and harvesting crops in harsh and unforgiving climates.

Hyperspectral imaging is playing an increasingly large role here because economic and life-sustaining decisions need data that is precise and actionable. Yet, while hyperspectral images contain a wealth of data, accurate interpretation of the image requires first-hand familiarity of the surface being analysed.

In the absence of ground-truthing, remotely sensed image analysis and classification is really no more than an inference or assumption regarding earth surface conditions no matter how spatially or spectrally resolute the source image happens to be.

Ground-based reference measurements can be used to verify airborne hyperspectral data, which means the combination represents a powerful solution for the remote-sensing community. As leaders in their respective areas, Headwall and ASD understand the relationship between ground-truthing and hyperspectral.

Spectral range for ground-truthing and hyperspectral

Case study: Wyoming Assessment Project and Remote Sensing of Leafy Spurge – A.P. Williams, D.J. Kazmer

A fundamental research need in leafy spurge and invasive plant management as a whole is cost-effective, large-scale mapping of plant populations. Hyperspectral airborne data was acquired over a

25-square-mile study area in Crook County, Wyoming. ASD’s FieldSpec spectroradiometer collected ground calibration and reflectance data of leafy spurge, other vegetation and soils. These spectra were used to perform spectral mixture analysis on the hyperspectral scene. A major advantage of this technique is that it can effectively unmix a pixel and provide an estimate of the real extent of leafy spurge within the pixel.

 

To further explore these techniques and your specific application, talk to the team at PAS in Australia or New Zealand.

 

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